Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, introduces a handful of noteworthy pieces from the March 2020 issue and reads from its opening pages.

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Jay Nordlinger, the music critic for The New Criterion, joins James Panero for a discussion of the classical music world and the life of a critic today.

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James Panero, the executive editor of The New Criterion, discusses the architectural history of one of New York’s artistic treasures, all the way up to the ill-advised renovations being undertaken today.

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Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, introduces the magazine’s “Sovereignty or Submission” conference held in Washington, D.C.

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John O’Sullivan, an editor at large at National Review, shares his thoughts on the importance of a national consensus and recent factors undermining it. Audio taken from The New Criterion’s “Sovereignty or Submission” conference in Washington, D.C.

A form of this address appeared in the January 2020 issue under the title, “The Left v. the nation.”

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Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.

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Michael Anton, a scholar and former staffer for the National Security Council, discusses the notion of a “liberal international order” and its place in the present-day war of ideas. Audio taken from The New Criterion’s “Sovereignty or Submission” conference in Washington, D.C.

An adapted form of this address appeared in the January 2020 issue of The New Criterion as “The enemy is an idea.”

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Angelo M. Codevilla, a professor emeritus of international relations at Boston University and a fellow at the Claremont Institute, discusses the notion of liberty as it relates to American history and self-governance.

An adapted form of this address appeared in the January 2020 issue of The New Criterion as “Liberty: collective and individual.”

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John Fonte, a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute and the author of Sovereignty or Submission: Will Americans Rule Themselves or be Ruled by Others? (Encounter), offers his thoughts on “transnational progressivism” and the forces abetting it.

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Victor Davis Hanson, who is the 2019–20 Visiting Critic for The New Criterion, discusses the notion of citizenship as understood in the twenty-first century. Audio taken from The New Criterion’s “Sovereignty or Submission” conference in Washington, D.C.

An adapted form of this address appeared in the January 2020 issue of The New Criterion as “Pre- and post-citizens.”

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James Piereson, a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, discusses the genesis of the American nation-state. Audio taken from The New Criterion’s “Sovereignty or Submission” conference in Washington, D.C.

An adapted form of this address appeared in the January 2020 issue of The New Criterion as “The idea of an American nation.”

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Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.

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James Panero on the legacy of John Simon (1925–2019), the inimitable critic and longtime contributor to The New Criterion.

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James Hankins, a Professor of History at Harvard, joins James Panero to discuss the monumental Leonardo exhibition at the Louvre and the artist’s legacy five hundred years after his death.

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The Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion discusses highlights in this month’s issue and remembers the life and work of Peter Collier.

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James Panero discusses the architectural virtues and vices of the American home, and culls a few examples of past styles from the city of Portland, Maine.

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James Panero recounts a recent trip to Mystic, Connecticut, and offers his thoughts on “J. M. W. Turner: Watercolors from Tate” and other developments at the Mystic Seaport Museum.

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Roger Kimball, the Editor and Publisher of The New Criterion, discusses highlights in this month’s issue and reads from its opening pages.

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When Harriet Cohen finishes playing her arrangement of Bach’s “Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier,” Jay says, “Holy stuff.” There is other stuff too in this episode: including “Tain’t What You Do (It’s How You Do It).” There may also be a little Beach Boys, classically performed. Jay likes that opening Bach piece so much, he ends with it, too: in a different version.

Bach-Cohen, “Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier

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Remarks occasioned by Criterion Books’ release of “Old House of Fear” by Russell Kirk, with a new introduction by James Panero.

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