Rob Long is in for Jim again Thursday. Today, Rob and Greg applaud Seattle businesses for suing the city for failing to provide essential services while local politicians coddled the radicals in the CHAZ/CHOP area. They also react to revelations in Peter Strzok’s notes that Barack Obama and Joe Biden were in on the planning to target Michael Flynn and the Trump administration. And they unload on leftist radicals and their enablers as what supposedly started as an effort to rein in police brutality is now focused on tearing down a statue celebrating emancipation, destroying Mount Rushmore, and changing our national anthem.

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Seth had the day off today so it was just Jay, Grant, and Park. In the first part of the show, the guys were joined by attorney Kyle Sammin to discuss his latest piece in the magazine called, Solving the social media standoff. Kyle goes into some possible solutions that don’t go as far as eliminating Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act but perhaps adding a new category specifically related to big social media companies such as Twitter and Facebook.

Also discussed is the renewed fight over statues and how people warned several years ago it would go beyond Confederate figures and begin to target figures such as Thomas Jefferson and George Washington.

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Rob Long is in for Jim Geraghty again. He and Greg rip into far left activist Shaun King for wanting all “European” depictions of Jesus torn down and discuss that the real target of many on the far left is not just religious artwork but the church itself. They also weigh in on why many police are doing nothing to stop the vandalism and destruction of statues and monuments and they address the political debate arising on the right about whether the police ought to clamp down and protect these properties or whether images of endless rioting are going to lead to more votes for Republicans in November. And they have fun with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who did nothing about rioting but is now on the warpath against illegal fireworks dealers.

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Rob Long is in for Jim again today and he and Greg are tackling three crazy martinis. First, they wade into the fight over the Theodore Roosevelt statue outside New York City’s Museum of Natural History, and Rob offers a deal to those who want to tear it down. They also discuss the drama surrounding the supposed resignation of U.S. Attorney Geoffery Berman, who then said he had not resigned and would not leave, only to be fired the next day. And they weigh in on Brett Favre likening Colin Kaepernick to Pat Tillman because both gave up NFL careers for the causes they believed in.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A New Look at a Global Conflict

 

The French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars was the world’s first truly global conflict. Although the Seven Years’ War and Wars of American Independence were fought globally, the round of fighting triggered by the French Revolution saw major campaigns on a wider geographic scale than seen previously or since. No war, including World War II saw major fighting in as many different continents.

“The Napoleonic Wars: A Global History,” by Alexander Mikaberidze examines the conflict from a global perspective.

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National Review Online Contributing Editor Rob Long joins Greg today to serve up your end-of-the-week martinis. First, they get a kick out of Amy Klobuchar taking herself out of the Biden veepstakes when it was already pretty clear she would not be the choice, but they also appreciate her kneecapping Elizabeth Warren’s chances by saying the running mate should be a woman of color. But that gets complicated too, as Rob and Greg react to Black Lives Matter and National Action Network figures suggesting Florida Rep. Val Demings is not really black because she used to be a police officer. And they unpack a lefty blogger’s contention that conservatives should not be able to teach, coach, or be a boss of any kind because they supposedly don’t believe in equality.

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This week on “The Learning Curve,” Cara and Gerard mark the Juneteenth commemoration
of the end of slavery with an episode devoted to Civil Rights history. They are joined by Diane McWhorter, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Carry Me Home: Birmingham, Alabama: The Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution. They explore the parallels between the current civil unrest and racial injustice the country is witnessing and what took place in 1963 in Birmingham, Alabama, including police brutality then and now, and the ongoing connection between race, economics, and political pressure. They discuss the Civil Rights Movement’s success with shifting public opinion, through nonviolent protests and indelible iconography, and whether strong statements and product name changes issued by so many corporations today are likely to lead to genuine structural change. They also delve into the role played by women in the Civil Rights Movement. Diane concludes with a reading from the epilogue of her book, Carry Me Home.

Stories of the Week: In England, the government will be funding tutoring programs to bridge learning gaps as a result of COVID school closures, targeted to disadvantaged communities. Is this a model worth exploring here? New York’s wealthy families have fled Manhattan due to COVID – will they return to those elite schools if remote learning continues in the fall, or shift to the suburbs?

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Juneteenth at 155 years

 

This is the 155th anniversary of the day slaves in Texas received the news that they were free. On June 19, 1865, Union Army Major General Gordon Granger read General Orders, Number 3, to the people of Galveston. It read in part:

The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freedmen are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Roof Koreans: How Civilians Defended Koreatown from Racist Violence During the 1992 LA Riots

 

Roof Koreans: How Civilians Defended Koreatown from Racist Violence During the 1992 LA RiotsThe riots of the spring of 2020 are far from without precedent in the United States. Indeed, they seem to happen once a generation at least. The 1992 Los Angeles Riots are such an example of these “generational riots.” And while most people know about the riots, less known – though quite well known at the time – were the phenomenon of the so-called “Roof Koreans.”

The Roof Koreans were spontaneous self-defense forces organized by the Korean community of Los Angeles, primarily centered in Koreatown, in response to violent and frequently racist attacks on their communities and businesses by primarily black looters and rioters during the Los Angeles Riots of 1992. Despite their best efforts, over 2,200 Korean-owned businesses were looted or burned to the ground during the riots. It is chilling to imagine how many would have suffered the same fate had the Koreans not been armed.

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Member Post

 

BOULDER, COLO. After hours of steady rainfall Wednesday afternoon, drivers on Boulder’s I-476 were surprised to see the chalky, white outline of what some are calling a “noose” emblazoned on a highway overpass. “As you can see, racism is built into the very fabric of the city,” said Naropa University women’s studies/interpretive dance professor Lesbia […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they applaud South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott for a pragmatic approach to police reform and for rightly hammering the Democratic characterization of his legislation as a “token” approach. They also rip Chief Justice John Roberts for siding with the four liberal justices in blocking the Trump administration’s effort to end DACA, which was unconstitutionally created in the first place. And they wade into the ugly back and forth between President Trump and former National Security Adviser John Bolton over Bolton’s scathing new book.

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Join Jim and Greg as they cheer Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley for calling out the Supreme Court’s recent judicial activism but also for upbraiding legislators for being too fearful to take up difficult issues and leaving them to the courts to resolve. They also slam NBC for attempting to get Google to deplatform The Federalist and Zero Hedge – largely based on objectionable content in the comments section. And they discuss NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell suddenly encouraging teams to sign Colin Kaepernick.

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Member Post

 

“The game of history is usually played by the best and the worst over the heads of the majority in the middle.”Eric Hoffer, The True Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements, Section 18. Recent events have brought me back to The True Believer for some perspective on the current hysteria. In it, which […]

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We’re talking sports on this episode — from the Lake Placid Olympics to the famous Joe Montana-Dwight Clark pass to Fingers’ long, painful journey with the Detroit Lions. Also, Teri has many crushes (spoiler alert: Bucky Dent is mentioned), not to mention her odd collection of memorabilia, and Fingers has a hate/hate relationship with soccer.

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It’s all good news on Tuesday’s Three Martini Lunch! Join Jim and Greg as they cheer a new rule which no longer requires many nonprofits to disclose donors to the IRS. They also cheer retail sales from May more than doubling expectations and suggesting Americans are ready to buy again. And they cheer politicians in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn for defying New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and busting open locked playgrounds in response to the city’s heavy-handed crackdown on the Orthodox Jewish community over COVID restrictions.

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Join Jim and Greg as they react to the Minneapolis City Council announcing an end to the police department but only after a year of community discussions. They also react to school officials in three major cities deciding to stop having resource officers in the schools. And they unload on New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio yet again for his personal and professional approaches to the coronavirus.

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In this episode, British author and filmmaker Damien Lewis sits down with Dave to discuss his new book, Churchill’s Shadow Raiders: The Race To Develop Radar, WWII’s Secret Invisible Weapon. The discussion (and the book) centers on a Top Secret mission to “snatch and grab,” Adolph Hitler’s prize possession; a rather highly advanced radar that enabled German anti-aircraft guns to decimate British bombers and otherwise run roughshod over anything and anyone that stood between the Third Reich and Hitler’s dreams of conquest. The daring courage and relentless tenacity of fledgling airborne commandos, spurred on by Winston Churchill over the objections of senior government officials, literally saved the war effort and became the genesis of the SAS. It’s a fascinating book, and a riveting conversation that you don’t want to miss.

Dave also welcomes Ricochet Member and Moderator Randy Weivoda onto the program to talk about various happenings with Ricochet Members, including plans for a large Ricochet Member Meet Up, next year in Louisiville, Kentucky. Interested? Listen for details!

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Minority Success in a Hard, Dirty Trade  

 

Whaling in the 18th through early 20th centuries was dangerous, required long stretches isolated from family and community, and required participants to live in squalor. Despite potentially high pay, few jobs were harder or less attractive. Except perhaps, slavery.

“Whaling Captains of Color: America’s First Meritocracy,” by Skip Finley, examines the lives of men who became whalers because it beat the alternatives. These included blacks, both runaway slaves and free-born, Native Americans, and Cape Verdeans: men marked by the color of their skin.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: History and Leaves

 

History is important. And keeping ourselves anchored to the lessons learned from history will enable us to emulate the best of what it means to be human.

The late novelist Michael Crichton is reported to have said, ‘If you don’t know history, then you don’t know anything. You are a leaf that doesn’t know it is part of a tree.’ 

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