Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I woke up in darkness. My head was pounding, and there was a wet, trickling feeling somewhere around my scalp. I peered blurrily around. I was in a cave, lit by strange glowing something-or-others. Crystals, maybe? Fungus? That in itself was a bad sign. More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

We have salad on our minds this week. Will salad bars be a thing of the past in a post-COVID19 world? Speaking of salad (days), remember when MTV used to be great?

Also, why does everyone hate Peter Gabriel?

More

It’s the first-ever al fresco edition of the Three Martini Lunch! Join Jim and Greg as they welcome encouraging news on the search for the coronavirus and that experts believe the economy might start improving in June. They also roll their eyes as California Gov. Gavin Newsom says the federal government must bail out his state or else first responders will be the first ones laid off. And they fire back at a Washington Post opinion writer who claims Americans would do much better against the coronavirus if we weren’t so skeptical of government and protective of our liberties.

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A Day in the Life of a Jeopardy! Contestant

 

The wait is finally over: this week, yours truly appears on that most revered of game shows, Jeopardy! Fun time kicks off on Thursday! You can read my FAQ here, or about the audition process here, but what I want to talk about right now is what it was actually like to go on the show and let you in on my day as a Jeopardy! Contestant. So, here we go.

I awoke early on Tuesday, March 11 at the Sheraton Four Points, Culver City. It was sometime before 5, and mainly because I couldn’t sleep anymore. The nerves were killing me, you see. After getting cleaned and straightened for the day, I headed down to the hotel lobby with a cup of oatmeal and protein bar in hand in search of coffee. While eating, several other people began hanging around and chatting. They too were conspicuously dressed; too well for normal work but just right for television. It was them. The other contestants had arrived.

More

Member Post

 

My wife recently started us watching Outlander, streaming it via Starz. I heard parts of the books on audio many years ago (a friend listened to them in the car) and have been intrigued. Well, we’ve really gotten into it, but I have to ask you all: Does the sex and violence ever let up? […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. PC Bosch?

 

One of the (dis)advantages of all the restaurants and bars being closed is that my “social life,” which previously consisted of designated driver services for tipsy friends and standing in bars with my arms crossed keeping an eye on their coats and purses, has largely been reduce to walking down the hall to interrupt Darling Daughter and talk to her about her non-plans for the day. That’s freed up about one evening per week, which means that I’m watching more streaming video.

My favorite police procedural, bar none, is Bosch, which Amazon produces and streams. I enjoy Michael Connelly’s detective fiction, and I think Amazon has done a terrific job of adopting his Bosch novels to the small screen. I identify in some odd way with the aging widower-with-daughter played by Titus Welliver (who is exactly one month younger than me), which makes the series even more appealing. (I also enjoy the surreal paintings of Hieronymus Bosch, though that doesn’t come up often.)

More

Member Post

 

Spin the big Kindle library wheel for a bargain book review and see if you’ve landed a nod, a dud, or a blank. This is a low-stakes game that might yield some good leads or fun screeds. It won’t hurt your wallet or leave you with life regrets. Here is how to play: 1.) LOOK: […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

On this week’s Gen Xish episode, Teri and Fingers talk about preparations for a pending meat shortage, the fallout for China and why the Left can’t tell the difference between the Gadsden and Confederate flags.

They also go over the best one hit wonders from the 80s, including … Rappin’ Rodney? And can the woke crowd handle “Turning Japanese”?

More

Member Post

 

I was catching up on old ‘Ricochet Podcast’ episodes and heard @jameslileks mention that he was in search of some good fiction podcasts. I thought I’d pitch some audio drama recommendations and make a post of it: 1865 (HIGHLY RECOMMENDED): Historical fiction of the events starting with the assassination of President Lincoln and leading up to […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

The good martini has the day off, so brace for three bad ones! Join Jim and Greg as they question New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s failure to change state policy that sends some COVID-19 patients to nursing homes after leaving the hospital. They also cringe at new Senate polls in Montana and North Carolina. And they remain concerned about our food supply chain (and have flashbacks to the 1980’s) as Wendy’s announces some of their locations cannot serve burgers right now.

More

Member Post

 

There have always been great Social Distancers, even in Hollywood. Pick your favorite Social Distancing Champions from Hollywood Yore: From Musicals – More

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Production has halted for movies and television. Surely some stuff is ‘in the can’ or ‘in the pipe’ [these metaphors don’t suggest much in the way of quality, do they], but there is going to be a big entertainment hole to be filled soon. Perhaps people will go outside and we’ll experience a Renaissance of […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Join Jim and Greg as they salute the stunning dedication of employees at a polypropylene plant in Pennsylvania. They’re also staggered by more than 26 million jobs lost and discuss how to re-engage the economy responsibly. And they assess data suggesting there were tens of thousands of coronavirus cases in American cities by March 1. Finally, they forecast tonight’s NFL Draft and Greg has fun imagining how National Review drafted Jim Geraghty back in the day.

More

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Overlooked Series for TV or Movie Adaptation

 

The Game of Thrones book series is nihilistic nonsensical bilge. But it makes for “good” television because that sort of mess seems to be popular in today’s culture, what with all the sex, sorcery, and savagery. As an actual story though? It’s terrible. Which is probably why George R.R. Martin could never finish it – it had no real logical “out”, no escape from its cycles of violence and revenge, save what the HBO writers could force together. Until HBO picked it up, though, it was unlikely fare for Hollywood treatment – Hollywood typically shies away from overly long fantasy cycles simply because such things are very expensive to cast and produce well, to say nothing of finding good writers to translate novels into scripts you can actually film. For all the awfulness of its story, I do give full credit to HBO for the solid work they put into the project over nearly a decade – one can deplore the story but still admire the brilliant and extremely skilled craftwork involved in telling it, and (more importantly) sticking with it at that high level for so long. Would that The Hobbit had been given that same dedication.

And now it seems we are to receive another attempt at telling the story of Dune. I am not excited at the prospect. The David Lynch film of the 80s was terrible. The SciFi Channel’s miniseries of 20 years ago was much better. But why Dune? Why yet another attempt? If Hollywood is looking for that next “big epic”, surely there are other and better stories to tell? Dune, the first book, is interesting, but has its weaknesses, while the rest of the series gets rather strange. Haven’t other authors written better and more compelling fantasy or science-fiction epics? Or must we continually return to just a few “classics”, like Amazon is trying to do with its pending Tolkien series? I would like to propose a few other authors and series that Hollywood should consider instead, and would invite you to make your own suggestions as well.

More

Join Jim and Greg for an upbeat Friday edition! Today, after assessing Joe Biden’s latest live television mess, they welcome the three-phase plan to bring the U.S. economy back to life. They also marvel at the medicinal and practical ways our hospitals are treating COVID-19. And they break down the curious arguments of Dr. Phil and Dr. Oz, both of whom became household names courtesy of Oprah.

More

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. ‘Foyle’s War’

 

I see that Amazon Prime is offering at least the first season of this British crime drama. My late wife and I watched it when it originally came out, almost two decades ago, and enjoyed it. It appeals to my sense of vicarious nostalgia, my longing for a time I never experienced and a romanticized and idealized simplicity that I’m pretty sure never existed.

“Foyle’s War” is set in Hastings, a town on the British coast south of London. The series begins in the summer of 1940: France has just been invaded, and the British people are on a wartime footing, afraid that a German invasion of their island is imminent. Detective Chief Superintendent Christopher Foyle, played in a charming and understated way by British actor Michael Kitchen, conducts the business of law enforcement under the shadow of invasion.

More

Jim starts this edition by blasting the World Health Organization for suggesting that alcohol consumption makes the coronavirus worse. Then he and Greg applaud Dr. Birx for calling out the WHO and China for a deadly lack of transparency that cost the rest of the world valuable time in preparing for the virus. They also lament the 22 million lost in the past four weeks and the lack of urgency in Congress to replenish funds for the Paycheck Protection Program – and discuss how to reopen the economy most responsibly. And they unload on New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy for admitting he never considered the Bill of Rights in having 15 people arrested for gathering at a synagogue in his state and Michigan’s Gretchen Whitmer for saying her severe restrictions are fine because it snowed in Michigan this week.

More

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. ‘Elder Scrolls’ a Virtual World of Possibilities

 
A scene from Elder Scrolls
A scene from Elder Scrolls

My husband and daughter have been playing the video game “Elder Scrolls” for a few years now (yes, they take breaks to eat, go to school, go to work, etc.). This virtual world is stunning in its detail and sprawl. When the weather is bleak outdoors, the digital forests with sun filtering through trees, birds singing, and wildflowers blooming give me a lift. Sometimes–although I would never publicize this on an online forum–when weather doesn’t permit walking, I jog in place in front of the screen, pretending to “run with” my daughter’s screen character. It is cheering, if there are no nightmarish beings attacking, to imagine I’m taking some air on cobbled paths winding through woods, or on a beach, or over a boardwalk. As my daughter works her way through the game, with its stiff storylines and stilted dialogue, we are building our own family lore around it, which to me is more amusing than what the Tolkien-wannabe scriptwriters offer. Here are some absurdities you can only get from the blending of real and programmed worlds:

Virtual Clutter: In Elder Scrolls, players constantly acquire objects and carry them around in their packs or whatever their digital conveyance is. If I understand it right, these items come in handy later, or give the player an edge in fighting, or extra food for recipes, or clothes. At times, it gets to be too much, so you can sell off items to people in the game, or you can dump them somewhere. Apparently, my husband has taken to dumping. My daughter discovered this after she spent some time buying herself a house and furnishing it how she liked. It was tidy and cozy, a calm retreat from battling mutants. One day, unsuspecting, she selected that area on the map to visit her home. My husband had been there before her. He had been busy cleaning out his gear, leaving items strewn around the medieval dwelling. And in the middle of the floor was a sacrificial heart.

More

Member Post

 

My wife and I watched Tiger King on Netflix, and I highly recommend it. In turns it’s a fascinating and horrifying documentary about people who keep collections of wild animals, and the PETA people who oppose them. I don’t know if you could invent some of these odd characters. It quickly becomes crazy people and […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.